Password Protection

July 12, 2014

You need to enter a password to gain access to a post and another one to ‘unrar’ a downloaded file

For more information see under ‘Password Protection’ on the right side of this blog

Lock

Artist: Ted Taylor

Profile:

Soul-blues singer Ted Taylor unleashed his stratospheric, falsetto-driven voice on a wide variety of material during the 1950s, ’60s, and ’70s, his gospel heritage never far from the surface. Taylor first entered the studio as a member of the Cadets and Jacks, a Los Angeles R&B vocal group with two names that recorded for Modern. By the late ’50s, Taylor was signed to Ebb, and a myriad of other imprints soon followed (notably Duke, where he waxed his first version of the sugary ballad “Be Ever Wonderful”), Okeh (his sides for the Columbia subsidiary were done in Chicago and Nashville), and Ronn, where he spent nearly a decade. A car wreck claimed his life in 1987. Bill Dahl, All Music Guide

More Info I
More Info II

Source

Album: Blues & Soul

Release date: 1965

Tracklist:

01. Don’t Deceive Me (Please Don’t Go)
02. Fannie Mae
03. Stay Away From My Baby
04. Find Me A New Love
05. I’m So Satisfied
06. Get Away
07. (Love Is Like A) Ramblin’ Rose
08. Big Wheel
09. Did She Mention My Name?
10. Why Do Fools Fall In Love?
11. No One But You
12. The Seventh Son

‘(Love Is Like A) Ramblin’ Rose’ On YouTube

Vinyl Covers (Click On The Thumbnails)

Cover 1Cover 2

Artist: Big Maybelle

Profile:

Her mountainous stature matching the sheer soulful power of her massive vocal talent, Big Maybelle was one of the premier R&B chanteuses of the 1950s. Her deep, gravelly voice was as singular as her recorded output for Okeh and Savoy, which ranged from down-in-the-alley blues to pop-slanted ballads. In 1967, she even covered ? & the Mysterians’ “96 Tears” (it was her final chart appearance). Alleged drug addiction leveled the mighty belter at the premature age of 47, but Maybelle packed a lot of living into her shortened lifespan.

Born Mabel Louise Smith, the singer strolled off with top honors at a Memphis amateur contest at the precocious age of eight. Gospel music was an important element in Maybelle’s intense vocal style, but the church wasn’t big enough to hold her talent. In 1936, she hooked up with Memphis bandleader Dave Clark; a few years later, Maybelle toured with the International Sweethearts of Rhythm. She debuted on wax with pianist Christine Chatman’s combo on Decca in 1944, before signing with Cincinnati’s King Records in 1947 for three singles of her own backed by trumpeter Hot Lips Page’s band.

Producer Fred Mendelsohn discovered Smith in the Queen City, re-christened her Big Maybelle, and signed her to Columbia’s OKeh R&B subsidiary in 1952. Her first Okeh platter, the unusual “Gabbin’ Blues” (written by tunesmith Rose Marie McCoy and arranger Leroy Kirkland) swiftly hit, climbing to the upper reaches of the R&B charts. “Way Back Home” and “My Country Man” made it a 1953 hat trick for Maybelle and OKeh. In 1955, she cut a rendition of “Whole Lot of Shakin’ Goin’ On” a full two years before Louisiana piano pumper Jerry Lee Lewis got his hands and feet on it. Mendelsohn soon brought her over to Herman Lubinsky’s Savoy diskery, where her tender rendition of the pop chestnut “Candy” proved another solid R&B hit in 1956. Maybelle rocked harder than ever at Savoy, her “Ring Dang Dilly,” “That’s a Pretty Good Love,” and “Tell Me Who” benefiting from blistering backing by New York’s top sessioneers. Her last Savoy date in 1959 reflected the changing trends in R&B; Howard Biggs’ stately arrangements encompassed four violins. Director Bert Stern immortalized her vivid blues-belting image in his documentary Jazz on a Summer’s Day, filmed in color at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival.

Maybelle persevered throughout the ’60s, recording for Brunswick, Scepter (her “Yesterday’s Kisses” found her coping admirably with the uptown soul sound), Chess, Rojac (source of “96 Tears”), and other labels. But the good years were long gone when she slipped into a diabetic coma and passed away in a Cleveland hospital in 1972. Bill Dahl, All Music Guide

More Info I
More Info II

Album: The Pure Soul Of ‘Big’ Maybelle

Release date: 1967

Tracklist:

01. 96 Tears
02. Mellow Yellow
03. That’s Life
04. There Must Be A Word
05. Eleanor Rigby
06. Love Is A Hurtin’ Thing
07. I Can’t Control Myself
08. Cabaret
09. Black Is Black
10. Coming On Strong
11. The Egg Plant That Ate Chicago
12. Turn The World Around The Other Way

’96 Tears’ On YouTube

Vinyl Covers (Click On The Thumbnails)

Cover 1Cover 2

Artist: Shirley Ellis

Profile:

New York vocalist and composer Shirley Ellis was in the Metronomes before earning fame as co-composer and performer of some enjoyable soul novelty tunes in the mid-’60s. These included the Top Ten R&B hits “The Nitty Gritty” and “The Name Game.” “The Name Game” was co-written with her manager and husband Lincoln Chase, and peaked at number four R&B and number three pop in 1965. She and Chase also collaborated on the follow-up, “The Clapping Song (Clap Pat Clap Slap),” which reached number 16 R&B, but also represented the end of the creative line for the trend. Ellis landed one final moderately successful, more conventional soul tune two years later, “Soul Time.” All except “Soul Time” were recorded for Congress; she had moved to Columbia by 1967, when “Soul Time” was issued. Ron Wynn, All Music Guide

Television stars weren’t the only entertainers who got typecast; for every Jerry Mathers (Leave It to Beaver), Gary Colman (Different Strokes), and Mr. Ed (Mr. Ed), the recording industry produced characters like Tiny Tim, Chubby Checker, and Shirley Ellis. Ellis started out singing soul, but after a debut LP on Congress went unnoticed, she came up with the gimmick on this sophomore album with hubby/manager Lincoln Chase of turning nursery rhymes and jump-rope sayings into popular songs. Make no mistake about it, “The Name Game” was a popular item, everybody sung the lyrics using their own nouns and pronouns in the rhyming scheme. “The Nitty Gritty” was less of a novelty, hit too. Give her producer credit, though; the many remakes are all unique — “Bring It on Home to Me” has a strange arrangement owing little to Sam Cooke’s original, “Shy One,” a pop-ish ballad, is the most serious offering, well maybe “Stardust” too — but most of these tunes, while well-executed, lack substance. Andrew Hamilton, All Music Guide

This is the album that was the follow-up to Shirley’s big hit “The Name Game” – a track that is probably known the world over, thanks to countless wedding band and Sesame Street cover versions! The record’s actually a nice batch of soul tracks with a raw sound to them, and includes Shirley’s other track “The Nitty Gritty”, plus “Such A Night”, “Don’t Let Go”, “Shy One”, and “I Never Will Forget”.

More Info I
More Info II
Source

Album: The Name Game

Release date: 1965

Tracklist:

01. The Name Game
02. Don’t Let Go
03. Kansas City
04. Shy One
05. Stardust
06. The Nitty Gritty
07. Such A Night
08. C.C. Rider
09. I Never Will Forget
10. Stagger Lee
11. Whisper To Me Wind
12. Bring It On Home To Me

‘The Name Game’ On YouTube

Vinyl Covers & Labels (Click On The Thumbnails)

Cover 1Cover 2Cover 1Cover 2

Artist: The Jaynetts

Profile:

The Jaynetts, from The Bronx, NY, recorded one of the more discussed recordings of all time, the mystical-sounding “Sally Go ‘Round the Roses,” which shot to number two on the pop charts in 1963. Though publicity photos showed three women as the Jaynetts, five were actually in the studio on the “Sally” recording session: Johnnie Louise Richardson (formerly of Johnnie & Joe), Ethel Davis, Mary Sue Wells, Yvonne Bushnell, and Ada Ray. Zell Sanders co-wrote the song with Lona Stevens, who later married producer Abner Spector. Spector, oddly enough, was a Chicago producer who later created blues recordings by the likes of Willie Dixon, Muddy Waters, Compton & Batteau, and blue-eyed soul singer Wayne Cochran. Around the time of “Sally Go ‘Round the Roses,” he had worked with the Corsairs and the Tune Weavers.

Spector had worked with Zell Sanders before on a record by the Hearts entitled “Dear Abby,” which received some airplay but never charted. Sanders had previously recorded the Hearts, beginning in 1953 when the group members were Hazel Crutchfield, Louise Harris, Joyce Weiss, and at various times, Betty Harris and Baby Washington. The Hearts on “Dear Abby,” however, were the same young women who sang on “Sally Go Round the Roses.” Obviously, some previous members got upset at Zell using their name so Tuff labeled subsequent recordings the Jaynetts.

Johnnie Louise Richardson remembered Abner Spector (he died of a stroke on October 25, 1988) as an electronics nut. Spector sequestered the girls in the studio on a Friday and didn’t allow them to leave until the following week when the recording was completed. Anybody who came in the studio during the enduring week of recording got on the track. Buddy Miles and Artie Butler are remembered as playing on the session. It’s rumored Spector had about 20 voices on “Sally,” and that the session cost more than $60,000 (unlikely since that was an unheard-of amount of money to spend on a single in 1963).

The song itself has a hypnotic feel, a crazy organ part, nursery rhyme-sounding lyrics, a wall of voices, and an undeniable funky beat. All kinds of theories have been tossed around about the song’s meaning. Some say it’s a religious experience, about a mental breakdown, about a closeted lesbian, etc…. all garbage. The song is simply a skip-rope rhyme said by girls when they jumped rope; some lyrics were added that fit the music and you had a song. With “Sally” it’s not the words, it’s that incessant beat, screaming organ, and the fading in and out that drives the tune. Follow-ups to “Sally Go ‘Round the Roses” like “Snowman, Snowman,” “Sweet Potato Nose,” and “Keep an Eye on Her” did nothing. Tuff gave up on the girls, but they continued recording on Zell Sanders’ J&S label, recording more non-charters: “Chicken, Chicken Crane or Crow,” “Who Stole the Cookie From the Cookie Jar,” and “Winky Dink.” Andrew Hamilton, All Music Guide

R&B vocal group the Hearts — high schoolers Louise Harris, Joyce West, Hazel Crutchfield and Forestine Barnes — was originally assembled by Bronx, NY-based Zell Sanders, an aspiring composer who recruited the girls to rehearse her songs. Accompanied by Sanders’ neighbor Rex Garvin on piano, the Hearts cut the single “Lonely Nights” for the tiny Baton label, scoring one of the earliest girl group hits when the record reached the R&B Top Ten in 1955. It looked like the group might never be heard from again when in 1963 the Hearts returned to the charts with “Dear Abby”; none of the original members remained, however — by now Sanders ran her own label, J&S Records, for which the same five vocalists (Johnnie Louise Richardson, Ethel Davis, Mary Sue Wells, Yvonne Bushnell, and Ada Ray) recorded under a variety of aliases including not only the Hearts but also the Poppies, the Z-Debs and, most famously, the Jaynetts, to whom the 1963 classic “Sally Go ‘Round the Roses” was credited. Rex Garvin, meanwhile, later cut a series of underground soul classics backed by his group the Mighty Cravers. Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide

A rare album that sells for at least a C-note if you can find a copy. The haunting title track, its successor “Keep an Eye on Her,” and “Dear Abby” are the centerpieces. “Abby,” credited to the Hearts, is a strange but effective innocent teen number that got it share of spins; the Hearts seek the advice of columnist Dear Abby and threaten to go outside and eat worms if their hearts aren’t soothed. The Jaynettes sang on the Hearts’ recordings and vice versa. Producer Abner Specter used whoever to achieve that sound, and singers like Baby Washington constantly dropped by. Also decent are “Seesaw,” “One Track Mind,” “Pick up My Marbles,” and “Archie’s Melody.” There’s also a popular instrumental of “Sally”; Spector hated wasting good cuts as B-sides so he used instrumentals and captioned them: “Sing Along Without the Jaynettes” or “Sing Along Without the Hearts,” a very popular concept back in the day. Andrew Hamilton, All Music Guide

More Info I
More Info II
More Info III

Album: Sally, Go ‘Round The Roses

Release date: 1963

Tracklist:

01. Sally, Go ‘Round The Roses (Vocal)
02. Seesaw
03. One Track Mind
04. I Wanna Know
05. No Love At All
06. Bongo Bobby
07. Keep An Eye On Her
08. School Days
09. Pick Up My Marbles
10. Dear Abby (The Hearts)
11. Archie’s Melody
12. Sally, Go ‘Round The Roses (Instrumental)

‘Sally, Go ‘Round The Roses (Vocal)’ On YouTube

Vinyl Covers& Labels & Promo (Click On The Thumbnails)

Cover 1Cover 2Cover 1Cover 2Cover 1

Artist: Ruby And The Romantics

Profile:

One of the great male/female soul vocal groups, Ruby & the Romantics had an epic single in 1963 with “Our Day Will Come.” It topped both the pop and R&B charts and for many is the definitive love/angst track. Lead vocalist Ruby Nash Curtis, Ed Roberts, George Lee, and Leroy Fann were the original members when they began in Akron in 1961. The male members had previously been working in a group known as the Supremes. Unfortunately, they never again repeated their chart success, even though they made some other excellent songs, such as 1964’s “When You’re Young and in Love,” as well as “Our Everlasting Love” and “Baby Come Home.” By 1966, they completely changed their personnel, with Curtis the only holdover. She then joined Richard Pryor, Vincent McLeod, Robert Lewis, Ronald Jackson, and Bill Evans. Ruby & the Romantics became an all-female group in 1968, as Denise Lewis and Cheryl Thomas now backed Curtis. But it didn’t matter, as they never recaptured the magic of “Our Day Will Come.” Ron Wynn, All Music Guide

More Info I
More Info II

Album: Our Day Will Come

Release date: 1963

Tracklist:

01. Our Day Will Come
02. Stranger On The Shore
03. Lonely People Do Foolish Things
04. The End Of The World
05. By The Way
06. My Prayer
07. I Don’t Know Why (I Just Do)
08. Heartaches
09. Moonlight And Music
10. (I’m Afraid) The Masquerade Is Over
11. Day Dreaming
12. I’m Sorry

‘Our Day Will Come’ On YouTube

Vinyl Covers & Labels (Click On The Thumbnails)

Cover 1Cover 2

Cover 1Cover 2